Saturday, January 26, 2008

BDAG

Is BDAG infallible?  

What say you?  

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10 Comments:

At 8:27 PM, Blogger mike said...

No

 
At 8:38 PM, Blogger Brian said...

good. just curious how people see it. I don't know if i always agree with his conclusions though I understand if one differs it should not be done lightly...

 
At 9:44 PM, Blogger Alan Knox said...

Nope. But it is a useful place to start.

-Alan

 
At 10:19 AM, Blogger Brian said...

you're right Alan, it is a really great place to start! Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

 
At 5:22 PM, Blogger Celucien L. Joseph said...

No Way Jose!

 
At 11:48 AM, Blogger Peter Kirk said...

Certainly not. It is most helpful as a way of finding out how various translators etc have translated the word in the past. It is not much use in determining whether a word could have a different meaning. So it will always tend to support traditional interpretations and not support any novel ideas - even if there is plenty of evidence for the novel ideas e.g. from non-biblical Greek.

 
At 3:10 PM, Blogger mike said...

why do you ask?

 
At 5:04 PM, Blogger Brian said...

well, I saw everyone getting fired up about BDAG on Nick's site and also all the inerrancy discussions so took a poll to see people's thought about it (probably should have used inerrant over infallible) - I typically have no qualms whatsoever about nearly all of Bauer's definitions but I think it is okay to disagree if there is a reasonable case for it. I wish I could remember a discussion we had in a Greek class about a BDAG definition that we talked about for a while - might have been the definition for harmotolos/harmatia.

 
At 8:38 PM, Blogger mike said...

the greatest strength of bdag isn't as much the defintions (though actual definitions over translation glosses is an amazing improvement) as it is the primary sources it makes available.

See here:
http://www.ntresources.com/bdag.html

 
At 5:54 PM, Blogger Brian said...

I have a hard copy of BDAG. But you are right it gives primary sources and also classical definitions/sources as well.

 

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